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New Fiction: You Can Fix Your Life

This is Not a Beach Book, Part II

My parents were angry at me because of You Can Fix Your Life.

       I found the book at the library. It was written by a woman named Karen Summerville. It’s about how your thoughts affect your life and you can make things happen if you think positively about it.

       My mom found it in my room and that’s when the argument began. She told dad and they called Fr. Schroederat St. John’s and made me go see him. He gave me this long talk about the occult, and the New Age, and how books like You Can Fix Your Life are portals to the demonic. “Your thoughts don’t create really, Kim,” he said. “God creates reality.”

Click here for Part 1 in this ongoing fiction series

Writing Stealthcon 101: Plots That Don’t Preach

Part 5 In a New Weekly Column With Advice for Conservative Creative Writers

Welcome to this series on how to write fiction from a conservative point of view. These posts can simply be read, or you are invited to join a guided writer’s workshop to practice and critique with other writers. To join the workshop, please email me, Jamie, at kywrite at gmail.com and request an invitation.

Comparing Mary with Fantasy Characters

The Blessed Mother’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, Part 3

About a year and a half ago, I wrote the article The Logos: A Perfect Man’s Odyssey Through Science Fiction and Fantasy, in which I compared the character of Jesus Christ with popular characters in fantasy and science fiction, such as Star Trek, Star Wars, select superheroes and The Lord of the Rings. My conclusion was that if he was considered merely as a literary figure, even in that limited sense, Jesus is a singular character in all of history, one that beats all other heroes at their own game. That is because he is portrayed as the Logos himself, a being incapable of making mistakes—but even more so—the model of perfection itself with unlimited, infinite power. No other figure comes even close—because, as I posited, it’s hard for mere humans to even grasp the existence of someone like that.

I now return with another comparable character, and one who is considered to be the greatest creature of all of God’s creation. Only the Logos, who is God and not a creature, is greater. And he is her son.

PreTeena: July 9 – July 15, 2018

Sunday Comics!

You won’t want to miss these hilarious cartoons depicting the ups and downs of adolescence. Now each week’s strips will debut on Sundays as the lead strip of Liberty Island’s Sunday Comics feature. If you draw a comic and would like to have your work featured on Sundays, please contact us: [email protected]

4 Superb Sunset Shots from December 8, 2016

*Submit your photographs of nature and the outdoor life to [email protected] to participate in this weekly feature exploring the natural world.*

The Incredibles 2: How To Waste A Good Premise

The Importance of Theme Revealed by Comparing the Original to the New Sequel…

I recently saw The Incredibles and The Incredibles 2 back to back. The Incredibles is a brilliant film: a master-class in storytelling and a lot of fun. The Incredibles 2 is a good film: enjoyable with exciting action sequences and several hilarious bits about parenting. However, in my judgment it does not approach the brilliance of its predecessor. And a big part of the difference, I think, is in the two films’ treatment of theme. [Spoilers ahead!]

The Growing Hidden Market for Information Appliances

Bringing in information appliances like Alexa and Siri costs you your privacy. They’ll monitor and record everything you say, parsing it for key terms to be used in advertising. However, I can’t say they aren’t for everyone. I’m going to ignore those who want to live in a networked home because it feels like the future has arrived and focus on those that are the best (or worst) case scenario.

VIDEO: Mike Baron Talks About His New Novel ‘Sons of Bitches’!

The prolific writer’s fourth Josh Pratt Book is Too Hot for Facebook

See the ad for the fourth book in the Bad Road Rising series that Facebook won’t show!

Robespierre’s Radical Liberalism: Reflections on Ruth Scurr’s Fatal Purity

Were Robespierre and the Jacobins Proto-Socialists?

Having recently finished Ruth Scurr’s biography on Robespierre, Fatal Purity, I have had my world turned upside down on the actions of Robespierre and the course of the French Revolution. Don’t get me wrong, I still think the French Revolution was a disaster, a massively overblown response to legitimate grievances against the ancien regime. But Scurr’s biography blew apart many preconceptions that I had about what the French Revolutionaries really wanted, the differences between the various revolutionary factions, and the conditions that lead to the infamous Committee of Public Safety that summarily executed thousands of innocent French citizens.

Like any biography, particularly one about a controversial figure such as Robespierre, Scurr’s biography is subject to different criticisms. She seems to me to try to be objective as possible, but of course, no history is perfect, and is always subject to different interpretations. This being said, the book seems to be generally favorably reviewed, and I am no expert on the French Revolution, so I am not going to review the book. Instead, I am just going to make some general observations about things I learned and what some valuable lessons from Robespierre’s life and role in the French Revolution could be.

I think the most important myth that Scurr’s book shatters is that Robespierre and the Jacobins were some kind of Proto-Socialists. This is a view held by both Robespierre’s admirers and detractors.

The Greatest Conservative Films: Captain America: Civil War (2016)

Editor’s Note: In April of 2017 writer Eric M. Blake began a series at Western Free Press naming the “Greatest Conservative Films.” The introduction explaining the rules and indexing all films included in the series can be found here. Liberty Island will feature cross-posts of select essays from the series with the aim of encouraging discussion at this cross-roads of cinematic art with political ideology. (Click here to see the original essay. Click here to see the previously cross-posted entries on Jackie Brown, Captain America: The First Avenger, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier.) If you would like join this dialogue please contact us at submissions [@] libertyislandmag.com.

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